To Log in to Market Watch or Sign up for a New Account Click Here

THE HOME TEAM
Laurie Mandle770-330-6471
Julie Auger678-315-4694
THE HOME TEAM
Laurie Mandle770-330-6471
Julie Auger678-315-4694

Homes in Towne Lake

Staged Homes Sell Faster!

1/28/2016

It's a known fact that a staged home sells faster and for a higher price than a non staged home.  The majority of people searching for a home have already seen it online before they decide visit in person.  Here's an example below of how professional photography and staging can turn that cold and small house  into a warm inviting home.

The Home Team offers not only free staging consultation but also one free hour of actual staging at no charge.  


1039_athena_ct_MLS_HID1087064_ROOMMainExterior 

 

IMG_0985
 1039_athena_ct_MLS_HID1087064_ROOMlivingroom1
 IMG_0990
 1039_athena_ct_MLS_HID1087064_ROOMbathroom
IMG_0986
1039_athena_ct_MLS_HID1087064_ROOMdiningroom2
IMG_0998
1039_athena_ct_MLS_HID1087064_ROOMporch1
1039_athena_ct_MLS_HID1087064_ROOMporch
 
 
 

Foundation Problems

8/3/2015

I thought this was a good article this month...

 
Homebuying: Beware of Foundation Problems
Contributed by Brandon Cartee
RISMEDIA, Monday, August 03, 2015— When buying a new home, chances are you spend a lot of time inspecting various aspects of the property. Before making an offer, be sure to take a closer look at one hidden area of the home: its foundation. Foundation problems can be costly to repair, so you need to know they exist before making the purchase.

A Door That Is Not Square

Often, signs of foundation problems are not at the foundation, but rather, higher in the home. For instance, when you close the front door to the home, it should be square to the door jam. If you notice that it is not, there has been movement on the frame. If you don't see a visible problem, open and close the door. Do you notice that it sticks, drags or does not close properly? This might mean that the foundation has shifted since the door and frame were added. Similarly, interior doors can show signs of problems. If any of the doors fail to close properly, then the house may have a foundation issue.

Cracks in Drywall
Carefully inspect the ceiling and walls, specifically around the corners and the corners of windows or doors. If you see cracks or drywall repair, then it may be a foundation issue. Not all cracks mean that the foundation is problematic, however, diagonal cracks from openings like windows and doors signify a problem.

Keep in mind that you may not be able to see these issues in newly painted homes. However, if the paint is at least six months old, then the issues will be visible, as the Bigger Pockets blog indicates.

Poor Drainage
Is water from the roof draining into the home's foundation? This is a recipe for disaster. This water can cause the soil around the foundation to swell, putting pressure on just parts of the foundation where the water runs into the soil. This can lead to damage. Unfortunately, by the time the damage is visible, it can be costly to repair, so look for drainage problems early.

Problems with Floors
While many foundation issues are revealed in the walls and doors, you can also see clues in the floors. Cracks, slopes and bulges in the floor can be an indicator of foundation settling. Most commonly, cracks in vinyl or ceramic tile placed over a concrete floor, like the floor of a basement, are signs of foundation problems. If these are extreme, then the home may have a serious foundation concern.

Foundation Separating from the Home

You may be thinking that you would notice if the foundation is settling away from the home, but you may not if the home has a lot of bushes and shrubs. Pull back bushes and shrubs to visually inspect the foundation of the home you are considering.

Windows That Stick
Windows can stick for a variety of reasons, including foundation issues. When inspecting a house you wish to purchase, open and close all of the windows. If you notice that some are sticking, dig a little deeper to see if the problem could be in the foundation.

Bricks or Siding
As you inspect the exterior of the home, carefully check the siding or bricks. If you notice that there are cracks or see spots where the bricks don't line up, then you should suspect foundation problems. Cracks in the foundation are a definite indicator of problems as well.

Weakness in Concrete

Finally, check the concrete around the foundation for chipping and flaking. Poke these areas using a screwdriver to see if they are soft. They should not be able to be damaged with this method. If you can damage the concrete, it may be deteriorating, which could lead to costly problems in the future. Deteriorating foundations have to be completely replaced, so you want to avoid this home.

Buying a home and discovering foundation problems later will mean costly repairs. If you notice a problem with the home's foundation, you may still be able to move forward with the purchase. Use the problem as an opportunity to negotiate for a lower purchase price, or ask the homeowner to make the repairs before you buy. The key is to understand exactly what you are buying before making a purchase.

Brandon Cartee is the owner of Foundation Repair Services, a full-service specialty contracting company that provides expert residential and commercial foundation repair and grouting services in North Carolina. 

This post was originally published on RISMedia's blog, Housecall. Check the blog daily for winning real estate tips for you and your clients.

Staging and Professional Photography

4/3/2015

Many realtors take their own pictures.  It saves money and gives you more control over what goes in your shots and allows you to move items etc.  Its hard to beat  a good professional photographer.

Sometimes it takes the eye of an objective  professional to see how furniture and accessories should be arranged to show off a room to it's fullest potential.     We took an already great home and made it look even better with some minimal staging and professional photographs.

This house sold in 2 days.  Remember - Most people view their potential home online before they ever step foot in the door.  A good first impression will lead to more showings and a quicker sale!

Before/After Photos - click on image for larger view

livingroombefore livingroomafter
 kitchenbefore kitchenafter
 masterbefore masterbedafter
 kiddiebathbeofre kiddiebathafter
 decbefore deckafter
   
   

Visit  Hometeamwoodstock.com  for help selling your home quickly!

Over Improving Your Home

12/4/2014

We get asked all the time...Will I get the money out of improving my home? Here's a great article.  

Need help finding or selling a home in Woodstock Ga?  Call Laurie and Julie - The Home Team.  Berkshire Hathaway Realtors woodstock Ga. 

Six Cautions about Over-improving Your Home

By Dana Dratch
RISMEDIA, Thursday, December 04, 2014— (TNS)—Call it the curse of over-improving: sinking so much into upgrades, renovations or additions that you’ve burned off nearly all the equity of your home.

When you sell, you “never get 100 cents on the dollar, no matter what the improvement,” says Erik H. Reisner, managing partner of a Vermont real estate company. “It may increase the value of the property, but not dollar for dollar.”

That means homeowners need to be careful when they plan home improvements, renovations or additions.

The Bottom Line

If it’s for your own use or helps you get more time in the house (like adding a first-floor bedroom), that’s smart. But if your sole purpose is to increase your home price or even “get it back at resale,” forget it.

Want to be wise with your renovation dollars? Here are six points to consider.

1. Over-improve for yourself

Are you over-improving to suit your own needs? That’s fine, says Pat Vredevoogd Combs, past president of the National Association of REALTORS® and vice president of a real estate firm in Grand Rapids, Mich.

But a smart homeowner thinks in terms of getting value through enjoyment of the project, not an increase in home value, she says.

So if you’re planning to over-improve the home for yourself and your family, do it while (or because) you’re planning for many years in this home, she says.

Short-Timers Should Keep as Is

“If you just bought the house of your dreams and you’re planning to stay there for the next 20 years, do it and enjoy the heck out of it,” Combs says. “If you’re planning to move in the next three to five years, bite your tongue and bide your time.”

Renee Behr, broker associate in Colorado Springs, Colo., agrees. Over-improving can be OK, she says, if you plan on staying there, or “you don’t care if you get it back when you sell.”

2. Big improvements don’t yield big bucks

There’s one in every neighborhood: the guy who’s convinced if he adds enough granite, hardwood and molding to his modest house, he can get palace prices when he sells.

“Just because a house has new countertops and a brand-new master bath doesn’t mean you’ve made more square footage in your house,” Combs says. “Compared to houses down the street with the same amount of square footage,” the prices will be basically the same, she says.

Over-improved for the location

Reisner recalls one homeowner who owned a $400,000 house in a $400,000 neighborhood. The owner “did a ton of renovations and additions” and then listed it for $700,000.

“We do run into this all the time,” Combs says. And while over-improved houses can sometimes sell faster, they still don’t return the money their owners put into them, she says.

Even in the rooms that are renovated most often—kitchens and bathrooms—it’s possible to over-improve, says Katie Severance, co-author of “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Selling Your Home” and REALTOR® in Montclair, N.J.

3. Over-improving scares buyers

You’ve done it all: turned that master bedroom into a sweet suite, attached a luxury bathroom and added a deck. Or maybe you transformed a plain-Jane kitchen and never-used dining room into an uber-cool great room cum gathering spot.

But if your house is the most expensive in the neighborhood, that scares buyers, Severance says.

“Buyers are apprehensive about buying the most expensive house on the street.”

Adding a room swells the price if you’ve increased the square footage, Combs says. If your addition puts you at or over the highest prices in the neighborhood, “you’ll have a hard time” at resale, she says.

4. ‘Too-little yard’ syndrome

While more square footage often equals higher home value, pay attention to how an addition affects the yard, Severance says.

“Stand on the sidewalk and look at the other houses,” Severance advises. “Is what you’re planning consistent with the scale of the other houses?

“The size of the yard is a major factor for buyers,” she says. And if the house crowds the yard, it doesn’t matter how upgraded the inside is.

One of the most financially dangerous over-improvements is outsized additions that are either too big for the neighborhood or too large for the lot, she says.

5. Play ‘count the bedrooms’

It’s not always the major renovations that cause problems at resale, Severance says.

One thing to watch: the number of bedrooms, relative to the rest of the neighborhood.

If you have four or fewer bedrooms, then converting one into a walk-in closet or taking that space to add on to an adjoining room could make your house worth less when you sell, Severance says.

Keep Enough Bedrooms


“Demographically, Americans are having fewer children,” she says. For the most part, buyers “don’t need these six- and seven-bedroom houses anymore.”

But, depending on the neighborhood, a smart buyer keeps at least four bedrooms, she says. If you want to style any of them as hobby rooms or man caves, that’s fine, Severance says. Just avoid changes that require actual renovations — like knocking out or moving walls.

6. Renovation = personalization

You want a swimming pool. The next buyer? Not so much. With every renovation you make, you personalize your house and customize it for your own use.

And that’s one more reason to improve—and over-improve—for yourself alone. Special amenities that you consider an upgrade may not have any value for the next buyer, Severance says.

Some will see your sparkling pool as luxurious, even glamorous. Others could view it as a maintenance hassle and a liability, she says.

Dana Dratch writes about mortgages and other personal finance topics for Bankrate.com.

©2014 Bankrate.com
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

6 Seemingly Smart Moves That May Ruin Your Remodel

11/10/2014
 
By Darryl Crosby
RISMEDIA, Monday, November 10, 2014— You are dying to get an updated home, and you are very excited for the remodeling process to begin. But you aren’t naive. You have heard the horror stories about renovations, and you intend to make yours go smoothly. So you have done your homework, dotted your i’s and crossed your t’s, and you are confident your remodel will go off without a hitch. However, if one of these common mistakes is part of your strategy, you might want to think again.

Doing the Shopping Yourself

You might think that you can save yourself a boatload of cash by purchasing the materials on your own and just having the contractor perform the labor, but Houzz believes that this couldn’t be further from the truth. Contractors will usually be able to get trade discounts on the materials, but more than that, they have the expertise necessary to know which supplies you can go cheap on, and which ones need to be the name brands. Allowing the contractor to purchase the materials also ensures you actually get what you need for the project — and if something goes awry along the way, it’s all on them.

Not Paying In Full

In order to protect yourself from getting screwed over by your contractor, you just won’t pay his entire fee upfront. That will guarantee he finishes so that he gets the rest of his money, right? Wrong! By not paying all of the money at the beginning, the contractor may be forced to take shortcuts or skip steps because he doesn’t have enough overhead to cover the materials. Either that or he will charge you more to cover that extra amount in case he doesn’t finish at all. Neither scenario is a win for you.

Trusting Your Contractor

It’s very nice of you to hire a contractor and turn the job over to him without a second thought, but doing so is a huge mistake. Why? As HGTV points out, if you don’t know anything about what the project entails you won’t be able to spot a mistake or a shortcut when it occurs. To make sure you know which questions to ask and when to intervene, you should do a little bit of research about the project in advance. That being says, it is crucial to remember that your contractor is the expert, so don’t get too involved or you will just make him mad.

Related: For more remodeling tips, click here.

Not Finding a Temporary Place to Live

When you are embarking on a dramatic change it can be tempting to try to stay in your home throughout the process. After all, that means less money is spent on temporary housing and you can maintain a first-hand view of the work being done. However, this decision may actually be costing you more than you would spend on a part-time rental, and it will irritate your contractor. At the end of the day, the crew will have to clean up everything so that your home stays in a livable condition. This means more labor costs for you. And if you were part of the crew, wouldn’t it bug you?

Thinking the Quote is the Final Bill

Even though your contractor gave you a firm quote, it is always a good idea to set aside a little extra for the just-in-case scenarios. The price you received from the contractor only includes the planned work, and, as Consumer Reports points out, there are often unexpected expenses that arise with a large remodeling project. If you have watched any home remodeling shows on TV, then you know this to be true. Some things can’t be known until walls and floors are ripped apart.

Skipping the Permits

Yes, it can be tempting to conveniently forget about the permits you are supposed to get during a remodel. From the fees to the paperwork, no one is arguing that they aren’t a pain. But if it turns out that your plumbing or electrical work doesn’t meet code, you can be forced to redo them on your own dime. Not only that, but you won’t be able to sell your home without all of the proper permits in place.

Remodeling your home is a very exciting and stressful time. If you can avoid the above mistakes, then your renovation is likely to go smoothly, and you will be able to enjoy your new home in no time at all.

Darryl Crosby is a home renovation blogger and the Senior Director of Marketing at Case Design/Remodeling, Inc. Darryl works with his customers to ensure that they are making all of the correct decision throughout the remodeling process.

View this original post on the RISMedia blog, Housecall.

 

7 Must Do's For First Time Home Buyers

10/20/2014

If you are looking for a homes for sale in Woodstock in Woodstock Ga contact Berkshire Hathaway Realtors Julie Auger and Laurie Mandle. 

 
 
 

RISMEDIA, Monday, October 20, 2014— (MCT)—Buying your first home can be nerve-wracking. As a first-time homebuyer, you will navigate a process that might include uncertainty, excitement, confusion and frustration.

But preparation and knowledge can help you stay on the right track. Here are seven steps that can improve your chances of having a good homebuying experience.

Know Your Credit

If you think you may want to buy a home in the near future, your first step — and perhaps the most important one — is to watch your credit. Familiarize yourself with your credit history and make sure all the information in your credit reports is accurate.

“The very first thing you need to do is to find out what your credit is and what’s being reported about your credit,” says Pava Leyrer, director of training for Northern Mortgage Services in Grandville, Mich.

This will give you enough time to deal with any reporting errors on your report or improve your credit before you are ready to buy, Leyrer explains.

If all looks good, keep it up and don’t max out your credit cards at the furniture store after you sign a contract for the home.

Hire a Good Team

Buying a home for the first time is supposed to be fun, but it’s actually hard work, and at some point during this process you will feel overwhelmed. You’ll need to be surrounded by professionals who know what they are doing so they can guide you and provide answers to your questions.

“Formulate a good team to help you,” says Rafael Castellanos, an attorney and managing director at Expert Title Insurance in New York. “You don’t want someone who is going to pressure you to buy the one or two exclusive listings that they have.”

Find an experienced real estate agent, a reputable mortgage professional and a real estate attorney if you can.

“You cannot have an inexperienced buyer and an inexperienced agent,” says Patty Da Silva, owner of Green Realty Properties in Davie, Fla. “Who you hire is truly one of the most important things.”

Get Preapproved for a Mortgage

Homebuying does not begin with home searching — unless you are sitting on a pile of cash and won’t need a mortgage. Otherwise, make sure you get a preapproval from a lender before you even begin hunting for a home.

And make sure it’s a true preapproval and not just a prequalification, Da Silva says. Some lenders will tell you that you prequalify for the loan based on the income and credit information you have provided. That’s not good enough for most sellers today.

With a real preapproval, the lender will verify your income documentation and not just check your credit.

“Have your finances really ready,” Da Silva says.

Determine A Budget and Stick to It

Don’t wait until you are shopping for a house to find out how much home you can afford.

Determine your budget and the monthly payments you can afford and qualify for early in the process.

Most importantly, stick to the plan.

“When you fall in love with a house, all common sense goes out the window,” Leyrer says. “Make sure you know what’s going to fit your budget and stay in control.”

Remember that it’s not just about the mortgage payments. Also consider the costs of your property taxes and homeowners insurance.

Time the End of Your Lease

How long will it take to find the home I love? When will I close? When will I move in? Until you actually sign a contract to buy your first home, these questions will remain unanswered.

Still, you have to do your best to time your closing and moving with the end of your lease.

As you begin your search for a home, revisit your lease agreement. See when the lease expires, learn about penalties for breaking the lease in case it comes to that and find out the options that are available, in case you need a lease extension.

“Moving is one of the most stressful things you are going to do in your life,” Da Silva says. “Be prepared. Talk to your landlord and ask, ‘Would you be willing to give me a two-month extension if I need it?’”

Consider Down Payment Assistance

Many first-time homebuyers overlook down-payment assistance programs that may be available to them through state and local housing authorities.

They often assume that these programs are for low-income buyers only, says Rob Chrane, president of Down Payment Resource. But there are numerous programs available for mid-income buyers.

Some of the programs offer no-interest loans or grants as down-payment assistance and have few strings attached. Be sure to check with your local housing authority and ask for a list of lenders that participate in these programs when you begin shopping for a home.

Inspect the Home Before and Right Before

You’re making a huge investment. Have it inspected by a reputable home inspector while you are under contract.

“You want to know how’s the roof, the plumbing, the electrical — there are a lot of variables involved,” Castellanos says.
And don’t forget to do your final inspection on the day of closing. If you are tempted to get the walk-through inspection out of the way the day before closing, think twice. A lot can happen overnight.

“We had something happen where the buyer did the walk-through one day, then the closing was the next day and the air conditioning had flooded the first floor of the house,” Da Silva says. “Always do a walk-through the day of closing.”

 

Realtor Woodstock Ga - Laurie Mandle and Julie Auger

Home in Downtown Woodstock

10/13/2014

Downtown Woodstock has some of the most amazing homes in the Woodstock area and offers, shopping, dining , music and arts all in one place.  We thought it would be fun to highlight some of the amazing homes in Downtown Woodstock and our first is The Wright House.  Wanting to downsize but still be in an active community the Wrights recently moved from Towne Lake to Downtown Woodstock.  Although their home is smaller than their previous home its soaring ceilings and open spaces make it feel just as spacious.  Jody Wright, the homeowner made all of her own drapes.

Home in Downtown Woodstock
Home in Downtown Woodstock

jodyentry

 

Living Room
Living Room
Downstairs Bath
Downstairs Bath

 

living/kitchen
Living/Kitchen

 

jodycurtain6

Master Bedroom
Master Bedroom
Master Bath
Master Bath

 If you are interested in Homes For Sale in Downtown Woodstock, call the Home Team Realtors in Woodstock Ga.  Laurie Mandle and Julie Auger - Berkshire Hathaway Realtors, Woodstock Ga. 

 

Identity Theft Tips -

10/6/2014
5 Tips for Protecting against Identity Theft during a Move
By Anne Wynter

RsmEDIA, Saturday, October 04, 2014—

Even when a move goes off without a hitch, it can still be one of life’s most stressful events. The last thing you want is to be caught off guard by a case of identity theft just as you’re settling into your new home. Unfortunately, moving can put a big target on your back for identity thieves.

“Transporting documents and electronic devices that contain sensitive personal information, leaving a residence unoccupied and [losing] misdirected mail are all risks associated with moving,” says Stacey Vogler, managing director of insurance company Protect Your Bubble.

If your stress levels are skyrocketing at the thought of having your identity stolen in the middle of your next move, take a deep breath and follow these five tips for protecting yourself against identity theft.

1. Choose a Reputable Moving Company. While a great moving company can make your relocation easier and more efficient, dishonest movers can quickly turn the process into a nightmare. Don’t forget that moving professionals often have direct access to your private possessions and information, so you always should do research to make sure a company is trustworthy. Before you hire a mover, read customer reviews online and view a company’s rating with the Better Business Bureau, recommends Robert Siciliano, identity theft expert with BestIDTheftCompanys.com.

2. Keep Sensitive Documents Safe. If you’re holding on to a large number of old bills and financial records, reduce your risk by getting rid of sensitive documents you don’t need.

“Sort through stored paperwork to determine what should be moved to the new location and what can be discarded,” Vogler says.

Just make sure you’ve got a shredding machine handy to prevent identity thieves from combing through your trash or recycling bins for valuable information.

Organize all the sensitive documents you want to keep and separate them from the belongings your movers will be handling. Vogler recommends storing your most important records—including passports, birth certificates and Social Security cards—in a locked safe that stays with you during the move.

3. Safeguard Electronic Information. As more information is stored online and on electronic devices, it’s increasingly important to make sure no one gains access to your computers, tablets or smartphones while you’re in the midst of moving.

If you’re discarding, donating or selling old electronics before your move, thoroughly wipe all data from those devices. Keep your other devices safe with password protection before the movers show up.

4. Direct Your Mail to the Right Place.
Even if you shred or lock away all your existing sensitive information, you still need to consider the documents that are on their way to you. Financial records mailed to the wrong address easily can put you at risk for fraud, so be sure to set up a change of address with the U.S. Postal Service before you move, Vogler says.

To further prevent these records from falling into the wrong hands, get in touch with your financial institutions and verify that they have your new address on file, says Eva Velasquez, president and CEO of the Identity Theft Resource Center.

5. Consider a Credit Freeze.
For even more peace of mind during your next move, Siciliano recommends investing in a credit freeze. The reason? When an identity thief steals your information and tries to open up new lines of credit, lenders typically run a credit check.

“With a credit freeze, nobody can check your credit until you personally unlock the freeze,” Siciliano says.

Without access to this information, lenders are much less likely to grant a thief a new line of credit under your name.

To put this safeguard in place, you’ll need to contact each of the three credit reporting bureaus (Equifax, Experian and TransUnion), follow their credit freeze procedures and pay a small fee (usually $3 to $15) to each bureau.

While you could opt for a fraud alert to protect your credit, Siciliano recommends a credit freeze because a fraud alert lasts for only three months. “A credit freeze is forever,” he says. Putting a freeze in place gives you one less thing to worry about during your next move—and all future moves.

 

Identity Theft Tips -

10/6/2014
5 Tips for Protecting against Identity Theft during a Move
By Anne Wynter
RISMEDIA, Saturday, October 04, 2014— Even when a move goes off without a hitch, it can still be one of life’s most stressful events. The last thing you want is to be caught off guard by a case of identity theft just as you’re settling into your new home. Unfortunately, moving can put a big target on your back for identity thieves.

“Transporting documents and electronic devices that contain sensitive personal information, leaving a residence unoccupied and [losing] misdirected mail are all risks associated with moving,” says Stacey Vogler, managing director of insurance company Protect Your Bubble.

If your stress levels are skyrocketing at the thought of having your identity stolen in the middle of your next move, take a deep breath and follow these five tips for protecting yourself against identity theft.

1. Choose a Reputable Moving Company. While a great moving company can make your relocation easier and more efficient, dishonest movers can quickly turn the process into a nightmare. Don’t forget that moving professionals often have direct access to your private possessions and information, so you always should do research to make sure a company is trustworthy. Before you hire a mover, read customer reviews online and view a company’s rating with the Better Business Bureau, recommends Robert Siciliano, identity theft expert with BestIDTheftCompanys.com.

2. Keep Sensitive Documents Safe. If you’re holding on to a large number of old bills and financial records, reduce your risk by getting rid of sensitive documents you don’t need.

“Sort through stored paperwork to determine what should be moved to the new location and what can be discarded,” Vogler says.

Just make sure you’ve got a shredding machine handy to prevent identity thieves from combing through your trash or recycling bins for valuable information.

Organize all the sensitive documents you want to keep and separate them from the belongings your movers will be handling. Vogler recommends storing your most important records—including passports, birth certificates and Social Security cards—in a locked safe that stays with you during the move.

3. Safeguard Electronic Information. As more information is stored online and on electronic devices, it’s increasingly important to make sure no one gains access to your computers, tablets or smartphones while you’re in the midst of moving.

If you’re discarding, donating or selling old electronics before your move, thoroughly wipe all data from those devices. Keep your other devices safe with password protection before the movers show up.

4. Direct Your Mail to the Right Place.
Even if you shred or lock away all your existing sensitive information, you still need to consider the documents that are on their way to you. Financial records mailed to the wrong address easily can put you at risk for fraud, so be sure to set up a change of address with the U.S. Postal Service before you move, Vogler says.

To further prevent these records from falling into the wrong hands, get in touch with your financial institutions and verify that they have your new address on file, says Eva Velasquez, president and CEO of the Identity Theft Resource Center.

5. Consider a Credit Freeze.
For even more peace of mind during your next move, Siciliano recommends investing in a credit freeze. The reason? When an identity thief steals your information and tries to open up new lines of credit, lenders typically run a credit check.

“With a credit freeze, nobody can check your credit until you personally unlock the freeze,” Siciliano says.

Without access to this information, lenders are much less likely to grant a thief a new line of credit under your name.

To put this safeguard in place, you’ll need to contact each of the three credit reporting bureaus (Equifax, Experian and TransUnion), follow their credit freeze procedures and pay a small fee (usually $3 to $15) to each bureau.

While you could opt for a fraud alert to protect your credit, Siciliano recommends a credit freeze because a fraud alert lasts for only three months. “A credit freeze is forever,” he says. Putting a freeze in place gives you one less thing to worry about during your next move—and all future moves.

 

Pretty Front Doors

9/29/2014

Selling your home is a little like online dating.  Wait...Its a lot like online dating, Especially now, when people do most of time looking for  a home online before they ever go out on an actual home finding trip. We all know  it's what's on the inside that counts..that's where you do most of the living, but if the outside is unappealing...forget it.  You won't get a showing..or a first date!

So...trim those bushes (mustache??) , paint the front door a pretty color like a fresh coat of lipstick and let's go!

While out walking this weekend with my daughter Alex we came across these pretty front doors in Virginia Highlands Atlanta.

Here's just a few.  Get ready Towne Lake..you are next!

front door
pretty front door
red front door
red front door
pretty front porch
pretty front porch

vhhouse5

grand front entry
grand front entry
blue house
blue house
cute porch
cute porch
front porch
front porch
front door
front door
front porch
front porch

 

Page:  of 000  |